Cycling & Your Family: Advice On How To Go On A Bike Tour With Kids

Family and cycling

Trips with the family are hard. Even the most mundane trip to Disneyland or the county park is full of planning.

Kids can be a pain, spouses and partners can be hard to deal with if it isn't their cup of tea.

If you're lucky, you have one of the two groups on your side. If the stars are aligned and have a four leaf clover, you have both willing to work with your trip ideas.

One of the hardest trips to plan and execute is a family bike tour.

Depending on the age of your kids, you may have to ride with them along with everything you need for a long trip. If your children are older than 14, they can most likely keep up with you even with a bit of complaining. Kids usually prefer riding BMX instead of regular bikes so keep that in mind.

This brief guide will give you the main details you need to make your dream bike trip a success.

Family Tours Vs. A Personal Tours

I've taken quite a few bike tours by myself, with a friend and with my family. Each has their bits of satisfaction, stress, and difficulty. A personal bike tour gives you the freedom to go at your pace. A family trip makes you be the shepherd to your cycling sheep by setting a reasonable pace if your kids are riding separately.

Family tours require more awareness.

  • You have to consider the visual stimulation aspect of the trip.
  • You have to plan for every individual member's rest and food as a group.
  • You have to make the stops count and plan for their ability to last based on age and experience.
  • Lastly, you have to consider safety and make sure those that will be responsible for their safety know what they need to know about biking, whether on the road or off.
Bike tour with family.

The Importance of Visual Stimulation

You should make sure your intended trip has plenty to look at. Whether it’s beautiful natural sights the entire way or just road, it’s hard for younger riders to stay motivated throughout heat, cold, or bugs if they don’t have something to keep them engaged.

Rest & Food

You have to make sure you are prepared to keep everyone well fed and in good shape. Nothing ruins a trip like having to end it because of an injury or from lack of nutrition and rest.

Make sure that every member of the group is feeling well. You will be responsible for making sure your kids are in tip-top shape throughout. Any lapse can lead to more headaches than you can imagine.

Plan For Their Age & Make The Stops Count

The stops should highlight portions of your trip trajectory that will break up the riding itself. Think of it as mini rewards for the group. It should be things such as tasty restaurants, interesting museums (no lard museums), and other places.

Consider Safety & Educate Your Children

Even if it seems obvious, take the time to educate your kids on proper riding formations, rules, and safety tips. Make sure they have all of the safety equipment they would need and be sure to bring a first aid kit.

Conclusion

As always, taking the time to plan your trips with your family in mind thoroughly can help minimize the difficulty, and maximize enjoyment.

If you incorporate the tips listed in this article into your planning and execution process, you'll be sure to make one of a kind memories with your family.

Happy family cycling

This post was last updated on September 21st, 2018 at 02:38 pm

About the Author Max Shumpert

Over the last few years, I’ve taken my love of the outdoors, hiking, skiing, trekking and exploring to the next level by starting this site. I started a bike shop in Denver, CO, and have seen amazing growth over the last few years. Getting paid to do what I love has been a dream come true for me. That’s also what led me to start BikesReviewed.com. In my shop, I spend a large amount of time helping people find the perfect bike for them and the style of biking they’re going to be doing. It only made sense that I expanded my reach and got online, making it possible for me to help people all over the world. If biking and staying fit is your priority, too, you’ve come to the right place.

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